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Misconceptions About the Psychology of Color

We hosted a Winnebago Buy Local expert panel a couple weeks back. I had the pleasure of being one of the marketing experts on the panel that answered questions about small business marketing.

Many topics were covered from media buying to branding. While discussing branding, I remember talking about how you have to trust your marketing professional. Business owners like to think that they are their target audience and that they know which shapes, colors, words, images, etc… will work better for their customers because “I am my audience, and I don’t like it”. Well, the truth is that this is a faulty way of thinking about the design process.

I had said during that discussion that if your designer says red is the best color to use, you have to trust them even if you don’t like the color red.

Well – I still stand by that statement, but I think it’s important to clarify something. Not all design professionals know what colors are best. Some of them like to think that every color will invoke specific reactions from people. They claim to understand “color theory” and “color psychology”. Usually, these people use meaningless industry jargon to make themselves sound better than they are. Too many “designers” read a fancy infographic and claim to know something about color in branding & design.

I am here to tell you, for the most part – color means a lot less than you think.  Here is a great article from Entrepreneur.com that discusses this exact topic.

The psychology of color as it relates to persuasion is one of the most interesting–and most controversial–aspects of marketing.

The reason: Most of today’s conversations on colors and persuasion consist of hunches, anecdotal evidence and advertisers blowing smoke about “colors and the mind.”

To alleviate this trend and give proper treatment to a truly fascinating element of human behavior, today we’re going to cover a selection of the most reliable research on color theory and persuasion.

Read more at the source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/233843

I think the general concept of this article is wrapped up well when they say “So the idea that colors such as yellow or purple are able to invoke some sort of hyper-specific emotion is about as accurate as your standard Tarot card reading.” However, color does play a huge part in the design process for a number of reasons:

  • Brand consistency
  • Product Awareness
  • Ease/Complication in Printing
  • Company/Brand Personality

But that doesn’t mean that using the color blue will automatically make you trustworthy. Having a trustworthy business is a better way to make people trust you.

 

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The Definitive Marketing Comparison

It’s no secret that Digital Marketing is taking over as the go to advertising medium around the world. With newspaper and magazine subscriptions shrinking, print ads don’t give the kind of return they use to. Then there’s internet TV and DVR eliminating a huge chunk of TV commercial viewership.

Of course, that’s not to say that traditional marketing is useless. It may not be what it use to be, but it still has its place. Businesses are still spending money on traditional, and it actually covers the majority of ad spend worldwide. However, this could mean that traditional is just that much more expensive, and ad spend doesn’t always result in a return.

So – we came up with a quick comparison for you. Hopefully, this will help you see the main differences between traditional and digital marketing. Then you can make a decision, after a consult with a professional marketing firm, about which path is best for your marketing goals.

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Can Artificial Intelligence Design a Better Logo Than You?

This is a great write up about the difference between a shortcut computer generated logo, and a professionally designed logo by an experienced firm.

In the late 1980s my then local Chinese takeaway inexplicably got a ‘Make your own business card’ machine. As a curious child, not yet set on a future design path, I can remember flicking through all the possible combinations of type and image whilst waiting for my food, having a clear idea of what my red serif type on white card, with an artist’s palette in the corner would look like if only I could raise the required funds.

Thirty years later for those looking to short-cut their brand identity in a cost-effective manner we have a new service entitled Logojoy. Their website proudly states, “By using artificial intelligence, genetic algorithms, and a few other fancy technologies, we’re empowering everyone to design their own logo.” What is this fancy technology they talk of? More importantly, what is a ‘genetic algorithm’ and does it make good logos?

There’s only one way to find out and that’s get my own logo commissioned. I went through the process signed up and got designing.

As the owner of a branding agency I thought we should run this against our own visual brand and its simple ingredients of a face, some typography and a strap line. You start your design journey by… read more by visiting the source

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